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Chuck your vanity

Friday, June 10, 2011


(Brought to you by Wikipedia, user-propulsed world of everything.)


A production logo is a logo used by movie studios and television production companies to brand what they produce. Logos for smaller companies are sometimes informally referred to as "vanity cards", "vanity logos" or "vogos".

Almost all production logos have become produced (or edited) on computers, and have reached a level of sophistication equivalent to that of the best special effects. There are some exceptions; the Mutant Enemy "grr, argh" ID was shot using a camcorder and paper models, and the producers of South Park even recycled footage from an old Braniff Airlines ad for their "vanity" logo. Producer Chuck Lorre uses his production card to post a long and unrestricted essay or observation in small type which changes each week and requires pausing with a recording device to read.

At the end of every episode of Dharma & Greg, Two and a Half Men, The Big Bang Theory and Mike & Molly, Lorre features a vanity card consisting of a message that usually reads like an editorial, essay, or observation on life. The card is shown for only a few seconds at most, meaning it cannot always be read during its original airing. Lorre also posts his vanity cards on his website, ChuckLorre.com. CBS has censored Lorre's vanity cards on several occasions. The uncensored cards can be found on his website. The production card used on Grace under Fire and Cybill featured a wooden desk with an Apple Macintosh SE.

posted by Primessa Espiritu
8:21 pm



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